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Eastern Temple

Hindu and Jain temples make up the Eastern Group, which lies close to the Khajuraho village. The larger group located within an enclosure is entirely dedicated to the Jain pantheon .

The three Jain temples in the eastern group of Khajuraho temples are Parasvnath temple , the Adinath temple and the Ghantai temple. The three main Hindu temples of the group are the Brahma, containing a four faced lingam, the Vamana, which is adorned on its outer walls with carving of apsaras in a variety of sensuous attitudes; and the Javari , with a richly-carved gateway and exterior sculptures.

The Parshvanatha Temple :

The Parsvanath temple is the largest of the Jain temples in Khajuraho .it is also one of the finest Jain temples in India . It has an image of Parshvanatha, a Jain Tirthankara in the sanctum. In fact another important temple of this group the Adinath temple is very near to the Parshvanath temple.

The Parsvanath temple was built in the mid of the 10th century. Measuring 65.6' by 36' (20m x 11m), the Parshvanatha temple is medium-sized building compared to the western group of temples of Khajuraho. It is enclosed within a wall bearing some of the finest sculpture especially on its northern walls. It is noted for the precision of its construction and its beautifully sculpted figures, which show sensitivity in its art. This temple does not have any sexual motifs.

The Parshvanath temple is the site for some of the most popular sculpted figures like that of the of the lovely sura-sundaris (celestial beauties) – one applying make-up and another removing a thorn from her feet on the southern façade and yet another tying on ankle-bells on the northern facade. The temple has a solid outer wall embellished with three bands of graceful sculptures depicting Hindu Gods (despite its affiliation as a Jain temple). More figures can be found on the outer face of the sanctum, depicting 'apsaras' (heavenly nymphs) in a variety of poses.

 

This Jain temple has been heavily renovated in this century. Some of the best known non-erotic sculptures of Khajuraho are found here, particularly the lovely sura-sundaris (celestial beauties) – one applying make-up and another removing a thorn from her feet on the southern façade and yet another tying on ankle-bells on the northern façade. The outer walls of the temple have a number of figures of Vaishnava (Hindus) deities carved on the wall panels despite its affiliation as a Jain temple. The outer face of the sanctum depicts 'apsaras' (heavenly nymphs) in a variety of poses.

The themes of these carvings are picked from everyday life activities. Actions performed in daily life are beautifully shown through the work of the master craftsmen. A woman sits bent pensively on a letter, a lovely young girl removes a thorn from her foot, Sculptures including elephants, and lions and sea nymphs are also beautifully carved on the walls .

Within, the sanctum–the temple was originally dedicated to the first Tirthankara, Adinath and so inside the sanctum there is a throne, which faces a bull emblem of Adinath. The actual image of Parswanath from which the temple derives its name was installed as recently as 1860 .

The temple has two axial projections at the two ends. One on the east is the ardh mandap and other on the west is a small shrine behind the garbhgriha. It was built during the early part of Dhangadeva's reign.